Learning Styles | what are?

Learning Styles are preferred methods of learning. We all typically have a preference for one of four learning styles which are categorized into the Activist, Reflector, Theorist and Pragmatist.

Understanding how to work with your preferred learning style can help you to more effectively learn valuable lessons from your experiences, thereby allowing you to work smarter rather than harder toward your desired goals and objectives.

Let’s breakdown each of these learning styles in a little detail:

The Activist:

An Activist prefers time-framed activities; they seek involvement in a task and they learn best while taking risks. If this is your preferred learning style then it’s important to set tasks for yourself that have clear dates and deadlines. It’s also important to challenge yourself to step out of your comfort zone and get involved in a task right away. Moreover, set yourself various activities that will put your into learning situations, while also ensuring that there’s enough variety within these activities to keep your interests alive.

You have a preference for an Activist learning style if you answer affirmatively to the following set of questions:

Do deadlines help motivate you?

Do you have a tendency to take risks?

Do you enjoy doing new things?

Do you like being the center of attention?

Do you consider yourself to be an optimistic person?

Do you feel comfortable making mistakes?

Do you get bored easily doing the same things over again?

Bear in mind that as an Activist you will tend to take quick action without weighing up other possibilities. In other words, you will be tempted to take unnecessary risks. Moreover, you will want to do everything yourself, and you might even get bored very quickly when it comes to pursuing long-term goals.

What you do have going for you though is that you’re open-minded, optimistic, enthusiastic, and willing to give new things a go.

These are all things you must keep in mind to help optimize your output and results.

The Reflector:

A Reflector absolutely dislikes deadlines. If you set deadlines for yourself, then there is absolutely no chance you will follow through. Instead, you prefer to learn by watching, listening and by journaling your thoughts and experiences on paper. Above all else you prefer thinking tasks that challenge you intellectually. As such it’s important to set yourself activities that allow you time to think and reflect upon things before taking action.

You have a preference for a Reflector learning style if you answer affirmatively to the following set of questions:

Do you struggle working with deadlines?

Do you prefer to think and reflect before you act?

Do you tend to procrastinate and make decisions slowly?

Do you tend to hold yourself back from participating in activities?

Do you enjoy observing things from afar?

Do you enjoy intellectual challenges?

Do you tend to feel uncomfortable during pressure situations?

Bear in mind that as a Reflector you have a tendency to fall into the procrastination trap. You prefer instead to allow other people to take over and for them to take the spotlight. Furthermore you are very slow to make up your mind about things. As such, you tend not to take risks.

What you do have going for you is that you are very careful, thorough, methodical, and thoughtful. In other words, you don’t jump to conclusions very quickly.

These are all things you must keep in mind to help optimize your output and results.

The Theorist:

A Theorist enjoys connecting and making associations between things. You love gathering new information, insights and perspectives then using this new found knowledge to improve your life.

You are often very logical, objective, systematic and analytical. In some respects you are very much a perfectionist by nature and will therefore do everything within your power to ensure that you avoid making mistakes.

As a result, you learn best using a rational approach. You enjoy tasks that involve a lot of research so that you can make sense of your world and circumstances before taking positive action.

You have a preference for a Theorist learning style if you answer affirmatively to the following set of questions:

Would you call yourself a rational thinker?

Would you consider yourself to be a disciplined person?

Do you enjoy making connections and associations between things?

Do you often conduct research before you take action on a problem?

Do you see yourself as a perfectionist?

Do you tend to feel uncomfortable when faced with uncertainty?

As a Theorist you are limited in your capacity to think creatively. Moreover, you have a low tolerance for uncertainty, disorder, and ambiguity. In fact, if something just doesn’t make any rational sense then you will always resist the idea. As such all the tasks and activities you set for yourself must be of a rational and measurable nature.

What you do have going for you is that you are very disciplined once you are committed to something.

These are all things you must keep in mind to help optimize your output and results.

The Pragmatist:

A Pragmatist enjoys solving problems and laying down their own path toward their goal and objective. You have a very practical approach to life and therefore learn best via real life experiences. As such, it’s important to set tasks that are practical and challenge your capacity to solve real world problems. In fact, as a Pragmatist you need space and time to experiment and make mistakes. Without the allowance for that time you aren’t often very effective.

You have a preference for a Pragmatist learning style if you answer affirmatively to the following set of questions:

Do you prefer to set your own plans?

Would you call yourself a practical and realistic thinker?

Do you get impatient with theories that don’t have any practical application?

Do you have a task-oriented nature?

Do you enjoy experimenting and learning from experience?

Do you prefer to solve your own problems?

Where you struggle is that you have a tendency to reject anything without obvious application. Moreover, you show disinterest in theories and can become rather impatient very quickly. In fact, you get very impatient with other people and prefer to focus on tasks rather than work with a group of people.

What you do have going for you is that you are often keen to test things out in practice and you have a systematic approach to solving problems.

These are all things you must keep in mind to help optimize your output and results.

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